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sathi akter
Aug 03, 2022
In Fashion Forum
People are unwilling, or, incapable of carrying out a full burial, opting for a simpler death process. Religious researcher Hidetoku Ugai (2016) believes that facing the situation of an aging society, Japan has entered a "burial-free society" (a society without burial), and the relationship between temples and residents established in the Edo period is about to collapse, and many temples eventually will face a crisis of extinction. At the beginning of 2020, The new coronavirus spread rapidly around the bulk sms service world. As of November 12, the epidemic curve in Japan has climbed again. There are currently 112,000 confirmed cases and 1,842 deaths. In view of the long-term impact of the new crown pneumonia on social operations, Japan has launched a life movement of "coexist with the new crown virus" (with コロナ), which will and may also change the concept and method of funerals. Judging from the current "one-day tomb" service, simplifying funerals and burial methods may speed up the advent of a society without burials. From the huge front and back round tombs in ancient times to the burial without burial in the post-epidemic era, death reflects the changes in social structure and environment, resulting in a burial and tomb culture With dramatic changes. Visiting these terrifying places, in addition to the fun of some sightseeing trips, can also allow us to think more deeply and understand the process of social change. references Edo History Research Association, translated by Zhang Beilei (2020). "The Life of Edo People is Super-Introduction". Hiking culture. Saito Hikomatsu (1981). A study of the cause of the Five Wheel Tower. Research on Buddhist Studies in India, 30(1), 381-384. Nobuya Isokawa (1981). The burial site and tomb system of Heiankyo and Medieval Kyoto. "Annual Report on the Investigation and Research of the Archaeological Relics in Kyoto University", 53-62. Keimuro Fumio (2009). The establishment and development of the Tanjia system. "Meiji University", (447), 27-54. This 経 Kai help (2005). Cultural Policy and Religious Policy of the Meiji Era -
Years, Japan's aging society has already taken shape. In many cases, content media
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